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Girl Scouts’ Highest Awards

Click here to see our latest Girl Scout Gold Award and GSSI’s Girl Scout Medal of Honor Recipients!

 

gold.jpgThe Girl Scout Gold Award, the highest award in Girl Scouting, recognizes the leadership, effort, and impact girls in grade 9-12 have had on their communities. Only about five per cent of eligible girls take the rigorous path toward earning this prestigious award, but those who complete the journey change the lives of others and their own in amazing and significant ways.  The Girl Scout Gold Award tradition will turn 100 in 2016.

 

A Gold Award project is something that a girl can be passionate about—in thought, deed, and action. The project is something that fulfills a need within a girl's community, creates change, and hopefully, is something that becomes ongoing. The project is more than a good service project—it encompasses organizational, leadership, and networking skills.


Girls typically spend a minimum 80 hours working on their projects, after the completion of two Girl Scout Journeys and project approval. Girl Scout Gold Award recipients do well in life! They rate their general success in life significantly higher and report higher success in reaching their goals within many areas.


Gold Award Forms



silver.jpgIntroduced in 1980, the Girl Scout Silver Award is the highest award girls in grades 6-8 can earn. It is symbolic of accomplishments in Girl Scouting and community activities, as a girl becomes her best self and builds the world around her. The Girl Scout Silver Award represents a girl's accomplishments in Girl Scouting and her community as she grows and works to improve her life and the lives of others.


Girls typically spend a minimum 60 hours working on their projects, after the completion of a Girl Scout Journey and project approval.


Silver Award Forms



bronze.jpgThe Girl Scout Bronze Award, the highest honor a Girl Scout in grades 4-5 can earn, was created by a troop of Girl Scout Juniors from an individual council and introduced in 2001. It requires a Girl Scout Junior to learn the leadership and planning skills necessary to follow through on a project that makes a positive impact on her community. Working towards this award demonstrates her commitment to helping others, improving her community and the world, and becoming the best she can be.


Girls typically spend a minimum 20 hours working on their projects, after the completion of a Girl Scout Journey and project approval.

 

Bronze Award Forms

 

Girl Scouts’ National Leadership Awards

National Leadership Awards.jpg There are three National Leadership Awards that are offered to Girl Scout Cadettes, Seniors and Ambassadors. These awards showcase a Girl Scout’s leadership and service. These awards include the Silver Torch Award (Cadette), Silver and Gold Torch Award (Senior) and the Gold Torch Award (Ambassador), as well as the Community Service Bar (Cadette, Senior and Ambassador), and the Service Bar to Girl Scouting (Cadette, Senior and Ambassador). Please submit the National Leadership Awards Report Form to the council office for approval of the award. Once the award has been approved, you will receive a letter from our office indicating how to purchase the awards. For the Community Service Bar, GSSI does not need to approve the organization you are working with prior to beginning your service.

 

 

Girl Scouts’ Teen Mentoring Awards

Teen Mentoring Awards.jpgWhen girls guide or teach others, they act as mentors. An exciting part of a Girl Scout's development, teen mentoring is a win-win proposition! As teen mentors, Girl Scout Cadettes, Seniors, and Ambassadors gain experience by sharing skills, testing knowledge, and trying out new leadership roles. For the girls being mentored, it means a chance to be with and learn from teens—some of their favorite people!


Teen Mentoring Awards include Program Aide, Counselor-in-Training I and II, and Volunteer-in-Training. By earning these awards, girls from sixth grade up can deepen their understanding of what leadership development means and get excited about guiding others. The Program Aide and Counselor-in-Training awards have a long history in Girl Scouting,  while the Volunteer-In Training-award represents an updated approach to the Leader-In-Training Award.   In 2011, The Girl’s Guide to Girl Scouting for Cadettes, Seniors, and Ambassadors include descriptions of the Teen Mentoring Awards they can earn at their grade level.

 
For more information on Teen Mentoring Awards, click here.

 

Journey Summit Awards

Girls who have completed all three Girl Scout Journeys for the program level are eligible to receive the Journey Summit Award.  This is a very special achievement for the girls!  It shows that the girls have really put their imagination into becoming leaders and have shown the world the changes they are capable of making.  Girls who have earned the Journey Summit Award will need to fill out the Journey Summit Award Report Form and submit it to the council office.  Once it is approved, girls will receive their Journey Summit Award in the mail and will also be recognized in the Link to Leaders.

 

 

Outstanding Graduating Girl Scout

Girl Scouts of Southern Illinois will award a scholarship to two GSSI Graduating Girl Scouts who stand out in Girl Scouts, leadership, school and service to the community. In addition to these two scholarships, as part of a staff campaign, GSSI Staff will award one additional scholarship! To be eligible, you must be a registered Girl Scout Ambassador who is graduating high school in 2015. You must also fill out the following application and have one person fill out the following reference form and submit them by February 12, 2015. Applications and reference form can be mailed or dropped off to either GSSI office or e-mailed to jfox@gsofsi.org.


Outstanding Graduating Girl Scout Application Form
Outstanding Graduating Girl Scout Reference Form

 

 

President’s Volunteer Service Award

The President’s Volunteer Service Award recognizes United States citizens and lawfully admitted permanent residents of the United States who have achieved the required number of hours of service over a 12-month time period – or cumulative hours over the course of a lifetime.

Requirements for award eligibility and award levels can be found here. Please submit the Individual Award Certification Form and $5.00 to the council office for approval of the award. Once approved, you will receive the awards package within 6-8 weeks.

 

 

Religious Awards

My Promise, My Faith Pin
Everything in Girl Scouting is based on the Girl Scout Promise and Law. The Girl Scout Law includes many of the principles and values common to most faiths. Thus, while a secular organization, Girl Scouts has, since the movement began, encouraged girls to take spiritual journeys via their faiths' religious recognitions.


Girls of all grade levels can now earn the My Promise, My Faith pin developed by Girl Scouts of the USA. This pin, which girls can earn once a year, complements existing religious recognitions and allows all girls to further strengthen the connection between their faith and Girl Scouts. A girl earns the My Promise, My Faith pin by carefully examining the Girl Scout Law and directly tying it to tenets of her faith. Requirements for this pin are included in The Girl's Guide to Girl Scouting for all levels.

 
Religious Recognitions
Religious recognitions are created by national religious organizations/committees to encourage the spiritual growth of their youth members and reinforce many of the values integral to Girl Scouting. While My Promise, My Faith helps girls connect Girl Scouting with their faith, the religious recognitions programs help girls grow stronger in and learn more specifically about their faith.

 

Each religious organization/committee develops and administers its own program. The To Serve God religious recognitions brochure shows the religious recognitions that have been created by various faith groups. You can find this brochure, a video that explains the religious recognitions programs, and other resources for collaborating with the faith community at P.R.A.Y. Publishing.


Some religious organizations are not affiliated with P.R.A.Y. or may not have a national office; to learn about their religious recognitions, contact their local leaders.

 
   
   

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